Stats NZ Information Release: Effects of COVID-19 on trade: 1 February–20 May 2020 (provisional)

Source: MIL-OSI Submissions

Effects of COVID-19 on trade: 1 February–20 May 2020 (provisional)

27 May 2020

Effects of COVID-19 on trade is a weekly update on New Zealand’s daily goods trade with the world from 1 February 2020. Comparing the values with previous years shows the potential impacts of COVID-19.

The data is provisional and should be regarded as an early, indicative estimate of intentions to trade only, subject to revision.

We advise caution in making decisions based on this data.

More data

Stats NZ COVID-19 dashboard presents the data in graphical format.

Definitions and metadata

Overseas merchandise trade weekly series – Datainfo+ provides the methodology used, and information on the quality and limitations of the dataset.

New app puts tailored COVID-19 information in the hands of health workers

Source: New Zealand Ministry of Health

A new mobile app, Āwhina, released today by the Ministry of Health will help health workers access the information they need about COVID-19.

Today’s release of the Āwhina app for health workers follows last week’s launch of the NZ COVID Tracer app, which is designed for all New Zealanders.

‘For many of us, COVID-19 has changed the way we live and work. For those working in the health and disability sector, this is especially true,’ says Deputy Director-General Data and Digital Shayne Hunter.

‘There is a lot of information health workers need quick access to, like the latest case definitions, clinical care pathways or Personal Protective Equipment guidance. Āwhina gives them access to this information from their mobile device anywhere, anytime.

‘Information for health workers is frequently updated based on latest research, advice, and changes to alert levels. Āwhina will notify health workers when new or updated content is available to them.

‘The emergence of COVID-19 and the response required by people working in the health and disability sector highlighted the need for a tool to provide easy access to the up-to-date information relevant to their area of work.

‘Digital technology can help ensure a coordinated, national approach and help us achieve better outcomes for everyone. At the moment Āwhina will be used to support the COVID-19 response but it can be used to get information to health workers to support any public health response,’ says Mr Hunter.

Health workers can quickly filter content so they can find what is relevant to them and can also save content in the app to give them quick access to it again later.

The Ministry developed the app with feedback from people working in the health sector, and by learning from approaches taken in other countries to get information about COVID-19 to health workers. 

‘Initially the app will be used for communicating information about COVID-19 to health workers but as we return to our new normal, we can use the app to share other information to help us act in a more cohesive, collective, and collaborative style.’

‘We hope New Zealanders working in the health and disability sector will find this app useful,’ says Mr Hunter. 

Āwhina is free to download from the Google Play Store and the Apple App Store. For more information visit Āwhina app.

The Ministry continues to encourage as many people as possible to download the NZ COVID Tracer app as it will help us identify, trace, test and isolate any cases of COVID-19.

NZ COVID Tracer is available from the Google Play Store and the Apple App Store. Further information about the app can be found at NZ COVID Tracer app.

Better protection for seabirds

Better protection for seabirds

Source: Department of Conservation

Introduction

Better protection for seabirds is being put in place with a new National Plan of Action to reduce fishing-related captures, Fisheries Minister Stuart Nash and Conservation Minister Eugenie Sage announced today.

Date:  27 May 2020 Source:  Office of the Minister of Conservation and the Minister of Fisheries

The National Plan of Action for Seabirds 2020 outlines our commitment to reduce fishing-related captures and associated seabird deaths. The new plan follows wide public consultation launched in November last year.

The plan focuses on innovative solutions and education to reduce seabird bycatch. It seeks to ensure fishing operators know how to avoid catching seabirds and take the appropriate steps to do so,” said Stuart Nash.

Aotearoa/New Zealand is a global hotspot for seabirds, including iconic albatross and petrel species that fly thousands of kilometres across the world’s oceans. The actions we take to look after them in New Zealand have a global impact,” said Eugenie Sage.

Seabirds are among the most threatened groups of birds globally. Fisheries bycatch is one of the greatest threats to many of them, along with invasive predators, disease, pollution, a changing climate and associated environmental change. That’s why the focus of the Action Plan is to reduce seabird deaths from fishing bycatch,” said Eugenie Sage.

The new National Plan of Action for seabirds plan will support all fishing interests to develop new bycatch mitigation practices and improve practices already in use. These include bird-scaring lines, weighted longlines, fishing at night, avoiding areas important to seabirds, and reducing discharge that attracts birds to fishing boats,” said Stuart Nash.

Some innovative solutions are already being used. Many current measures have come from industry, who have the technical knowledge needed for workable solutions,” he said.

The Action Plan has a vision of New Zealanders work toward zero fishing related seabird mortalities. We expect to see all fishers and the industry doing as much as they can to achieve this,” said Stuart Nash.

The new Action Plan will prompt species-specific actions where there is particular concern about threats to seabird populations. This has occurred already for Antipodean albatross and black petrels and is being done for hoiho (yellow-eyed penguin),” said Eugenie Sage.

The plan requires all fishing vessels at risk of accidentally catching seabirds to create risk management plans for protected species. These plans will be audited and regularly monitored against government standards” said Stuart Nash.

New Zealand is a global centre of seabird diversity with about 145 of the world’s 346 seabird species using New Zealand waters and 95 species breeding here. New Zealand has more endemic breeding species than any other country in the world.  90% of them are threatened with, or at risk of extinction.

Background information

145 of the world’s 346 seabird species use New Zealand waters and 95 seabird species breed here. The fact that so many species use New Zealand waters and breed here is a reason why New Zealand has more seabird species threatened or at risk of extinction than other countries.

View the finalised plan and other supporting documents 

The Plan provides clear goals and objectives, and is supported by an implementation plan for reducing fishing-related seabird deaths as well as putting in place tools to measure and report on progress annually.

While the focus of the Plan is on the commercial sector, from small family run boats to large factory boats, it also encompasses recreational fisheries that have an impact on seabirds. 

Regulatory tools are also available to ensure the objectives of the Plan are met. The fishery industry needs to innovate to reduce bycatch. A collaborative approach can help to solve bycatch issues through prevention, monitoring, education and research.

Fisheries New Zealand and the Department of Conservation reviewed and updated the Plan with input from an advisory group of stakeholders. The Plan was publicly consulted on between November 2019 and January 2020 with over 3,700 submissions received.

Contact

For media enquiries contact:

Phone: +64 4 496 1911
Email: media@doc.govt.nz

Parliament Oral Questions – Oral Questions – 27 May 2020000228

Parliament Oral Questions - Oral Questions - 27 May 2020000228

Source: New Zealand Parliament – Oral Questions and Answers

TODD MULLER to the Prime Minister: When she said yesterday that the Government was “using the tax system to get cashflow to small business”, what did she mean by that?

KIRITAPU ALLAN to the Minister of Finance: How will Budget 2020 support employment in New Zealand?

Hon PAUL GOLDSMITH to the Minister of Finance: How did the Government arrive at the figure of $50 billion that was allocated for the COVID-19 Response and Recovery Fund in Budget 2020, and is the Treasury being required to use the CBAx tool when assessing bids for the fund?

ANAHILA KANONGATA’A-SUISUIKI to the Minister of Housing: What action has the Government taken to ensure vulnerable New Zealanders in need of housing were supported through the COVID-19 crisis?

Hon JUDITH COLLINS to the Minister for Economic Development: Does he stand by his statement of 1 April 2020, “That’s why we are now developing a pipeline of infrastructure projects from across the country that would be ready to begin as soon as we are able to move around freely and go back to work.”; if so, when will he announce the projects?

CHRIS BISHOP to the Minister of Transport: Have officials recommended a process for Auckland light rail that would have allowed all market participants the opportunity to bid for the delivery of the project, and what is the most up-to-date estimate of the cost of the project he has received?

PAUL EAGLE to the Associate Minister of Housing (Māori Housing): What is the Government doing to create a partnership with Māori to get more whānau into warm, dry, and secure housing?

Hon MICHAEL WOODHOUSE to the Minister of Health: Did Budget 2020 provide funding to progressively increase the age for free breast-screening to 74; if not, why not?

MARAMA DAVIDSON to the Minister of Energy and Resources: How many more homes will be insulated with funding from the COVID-19 Response and Recovery Fund?

Hon LOUISE UPSTON to the Minister for Social Development: Will the COVID-19 income relief payment create a model for long-term changes to the welfare system; if so, how?

KIERAN McANULTY to the Minister for Building and Construction: What recent announcements has she made on cutting red tape to get people building?

Dr SHANE RETI to the Minister of Employment: Which employment programmes have been the most effective, and what is the average return on investment across all the programmes?

Answers to these questions are delivered from 2pm (New Zealand time) on the day of tabling. The answers can be accessed in text form, once Hansard is finalised, by clicking here.

Regulatory Impact Assessment: Countering violent extremism online – changes to censorship legislation to better protect New Zealanders from online harm

Source: New Zealand Treasury:

Version note: 

Some parts of this information release would not be appropriate to release and, if requested, would be withheld under the Official Information Act 1982 (the Act). Where information has been withheld, no public interest has been identified that would outweigh the reasons for withholding it.

Projet PROTEJEM « Amélioration de la protection des enfants et jeunes en mobilité sur les routes migratoires principales d’Afrique de l’Ouest »

Source: Save The Children

 

Recherche d’un Consultant  

 

Elaboration de l’étude « Profil des Enfants et Jeunes Migrants (EJM) et cartographie des acteurs et services de protection des enfants en Côte d’Ivoire, Guinée, Gambie et Sénégal »

 

 

Projet PROTEJEM

« Amélioration de la protection des enfants et jeunes en mobilité sur les routes migratoires principales d’Afrique de l’Ouest »

Soumission des dossiers de candidature

Le(s) candidat(e)s intéressé(e)s par cette consultation devront déposer un dossier comprenant :

–          Une lettre de motivation ;

–          Une offre technique incluant une note sur la compréhension de la mission, la méthodologie de travail adaptée au contexte Covid-19, un chronogramme spécifiant les dates de soumission de chaque produit attendu, ainsi que les CV détaillés et à jour de chaque membre de l’équipe de consultant(e)s. La méthodologie doit être concrète et clairement développée, notamment sur comment il/elle compte déployer la consultance dans les différents pays

–          Une liste d´un minimum de 2 (deux) références de prestations similaires avec la preuve du service ;

–          Une offre financière détaillé en F CFA.

Les dossiers de candidature doivent être envoyés par courrier électronique aux adresses suivantes :

–          Olga.frances@savethechildren.org

–          Jara.campelo@tdh.ch

La date de clôture de la réception des candidatures est fixée au 9 juin 2020.

Veuillez télécharger le document complet pour une information complète.

  1. Critères d’évaluation des offres :

 

–          Méthodologie proposée et adaptée au contexte Covid-19 : 25%

–          Chronogramme : 10%

–          Pertinence de l’expérience professionnelle (connaissances et expérience de recherche dans le domaine de la protection de l’enfant en général et en particulier dans le domaine des enfants en situation de mobilité) : 15%

–          Offre financière : 15%

–          Expérience de travail et en équipe dans des travaux similaires : 20%

–          Connaissance des questions de protection des enfants en dans les pays ciblés: 15

Search for missing trampers resumes

Search for missing trampers resumes

Source: New Zealand Police (District News)

The search for missing trampers Dion Reynolds and Jessica O’Connor resumed at first light this morning.

Six teams were being flown into the search area by the NZ Defence Force.

The search for signs of the missing pair is still centred around the Antori River and the coastline. 

Aerial searching will continue, with support from a commercial and an NZDF helicopter.

Five specialist tracking experts have been brought in from around New Zealand, as well as three search dog teams, to bolster the operation.

Teams entering the bush are expected to stay in overnight. 

The incident management team continues to grow, with more than 30 Police staff and volunteers working on the search operation from a number of different locations.

ENDS 

Issued by the Police Media Centre

Search for missing trampers resumes

Search for missing trampers resumes

Source: New Zealand Police (District News)

The search for missing trampers Dion Reynolds and Jessica O’Connor resumed at first light this morning.

Six teams were being flown into the search area by the NZ Defence Force.

The search for signs of the missing pair is still centred around the Antori River and the coastline. 

Aerial searching will continue, with support from a commercial and an NZDF helicopter.

Five specialist tracking experts have been brought in from around New Zealand, as well as three search dog teams, to bolster the operation.

Teams entering the bush are expected to stay in overnight. 

The incident management team continues to grow, with more than 30 Police staff and volunteers working on the search operation from a number of different locations.

ENDS 

Issued by the Police Media Centre

New research shows current benefits leave families in poverty

Source: Child Poverty Action Group (CPAG)

Recently released research shows families who rely on benefits could find themselves hundreds of dollars short every week of what’s required to get out of poverty.

As thousands are projected to lose their jobs and seek income support over the coming months, more and more children could be locked into poverty due to inadequate benefit levels, making New Zealand’s long term recovery from COVID-19 that much more difficult, says Child Poverty Action Group.

CPAG’s research shows that six model families with children receiving benefits would require an estimated $110 a week on average to reach 50 per cent of equivalised median after-housing-costs (AHC) income, and an extra $215 to reach 60 per cent of the same, meaning income support levels for the 2020/21 year are well below the Government’s official poverty measures+, even when recent benefit increases are included.

As part of its Covid-19 package, the Government increased benefits by $25 a week and temporarily doubled the Winter Energy Payment.

“While these increases are welcome, we find they are still nowhere near enough to unlock all children from poverty and allow them to thrive,” says CPAG’s Georgie Craw executive officer.

“This means many families are forced to rely on temporary top-ups, foodbanks, and high interest loans, just to survive.”

Child Poverty Action Group modelled the effect of latest policies for families accessing core benefits, accommodation supplement and Working for Families in 2020/2021.

The researchers found that after paying lower-quartile rent for a two-bedroom house in a low-income Auckland suburb, a couple on the Jobseeker benefit with two children receiving core entitlements would still need around $195 extra a week to reach the 50 per cent AHC poverty line. They would need $322 extra a week to reach the 60 per cent AHC line – a supplementary Government child poverty measure.

“While people’s income can be topped-up with hardship grants, these are temporary, and Work and Income manuals refer to them as a ‘last resort’,” says researcher Janet McAllister.

“Accessing them can be difficult, particularly when families are already trying to cope with the toxic stress of inadequate support.

“The supplementary systems are complex to navigate and often require people to run down their modest assets before accessing extra assistance.”

The twelve hypothetical households in the report – which include parents on Sole Parent Support with one and three children, parents on Jobseeker with two children, and individuals on Jobseeker, Supported Living Payments and NZ Superannuation – will have, on average, $41 more in the hand every week after they pay their lower-quartile rent in this current financial year than last year, an increase of 17.5 per cent in disposable income from last year.

Susan St John, CPAG’s economic spokesperson, says Child Poverty Action Group is alarmed that the Government did not increase core benefits to adequate levels.

“In the recent budget the Government had an opportunity to fix the inadequate levels of core benefits and to reform Working for Families (WFF) to make it immediately available in full to all low income families including those on benefits – and it is disappointing this opportunity was missed.

“However we will continue to advocate for these changes, as we are looking at an explosion in family hardship and child poverty unless the government takes urgent and meaningful action,” St John says.

+The Government charts how many children are in poverty based on 10 measures, which includes those children living in households with:

– less than 60% median equivalised disposable household income after housing costs (AHC).

– less than 50% median equivalised disposable household income after housing costs (AHC).

The full background paper titled: “The effects of 2020-21 income support changes on After Housing Costs (AHC) incomes for representative households receiving benefits” can be accessed here.

New Bill to counter violent extremism online

New Bill to counter violent extremism online

Source: New Zealand Government

New Zealanders will be better protected from online harm through a Bill introduced to Parliament today, says Internal Affairs Minister Tracey Martin.

“The internet brings many benefits to society but can also be used as a weapon to spread harmful and illegal content and that is what this legislation targets,” Minister Martin said.

“Our laws need to reflect the digital age and the Government has worked with industry partners to create this Bill, which will ensure law enforcement and industry partners can rapidly prevent and fight harm from illegal online content.”

The Films, Videos, and Publications Classification (Urgent Interim Classification of Publications and Prevention of Online Harm) Amendment Bill amends the current Act which dates from 1993.

Under the Bill:

  • the Chief Censor will be able to more quickly notify the public of objectionable content that could cause high levels of harm;
  • the livestreaming of objectionable content, as happened during the Christchurch terror attacks, will be a criminal offence;
  • the Government will be able to issue take down notices to online content hosts through an Inspector of Publications, requiring the removal of specific links to objectionable online content;
  • social media companies will come within the scope of current laws on objectionable content; and
  • legal parameters will be in place for a web filter to block objectionable content in the future, subject to further policy development and consultation.

The legislation supports commitments under the Christchurch Call, and complements extra funding announced last year to build capability in the Department of Internal Affairs and for the Chief Censor’s office to prevent and counter violent extremist content online. 

“This Bill is part of a wider government programme to address violent extremism,” Minister Martin said. “This is about protecting New Zealanders from harmful content they can be exposed to on their everyday social media feeds.”

The Bill will go through a standard select committee process to allow public participation. If passed, most changes will come into effect in mid-2021.

ENDS

Contact: Richard Ninness 021 892 536

Notes for editors

  • The Films, Videos, and Publications Classification Act 1993 (the Classification Act) governs censorship in New Zealand. Under the Classification Act, it is an offence to make, possess, supply or distribute an objectionable publication (including digital content).
  • Content is deemed to be objectionable if the availability of a given publication or digital content is likely to be injurious to the public good. Examples of content that could be considered include depictions of torture, sexual violence, child sexual abuse, or terrorism.
  • The Classification Act contains mechanisms to deter people from creating or sharing this illegal content, to allow authorities to investigate those who do and to prosecute them where appropriate.
  • Cabinet agreed on 16 December 2019 to policy proposals to amend the Classification Act and to draft the Bill.
  • Further consultation took place with key industry stakeholders on an exposure draft Bill, to ensure the changes would be workable in practice.