Arrest – Upper Hutt burglaries

Arrest - Upper Hutt burglaries

Source: New Zealand Police (District News)

Hutt Valley Police have arrested a 35-year-old woman in relation to two recent burglaries in the Upper Hutt area.

The woman has been charged with burglary and a number of fraud related offences as a result of allegedly using bankcards stolen in the burglaries.

She is due to appear in the Hutt Valley District Court tomorrow, Thursday 21 January 2021.

We are aware of how distressing recent burglaries have been for the Upper Hutt community. We want to reassure our community we are committed to holding offenders to account and urge anyone who sees anything suspicious to report it to Police.

ENDS

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Name release: Papamoa Beach cyclist death

Arrest - Upper Hutt burglaries

Source: New Zealand Police (District News)

Police can now name the teenager who died following a crash between a cyclist and a truck on Sandhurst Drive, Papamoa Beach yesterday, 19 January.

He was 14-year-old Hugo Shaw, of Cambridge.

Police would like to express its sympathy and condolences to his family at this time.

Enquiries into the circumstances of the crash are ongoing.

ENDS

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Ombudsman – Disability rights report highlights challenges under lockdown

Source: MIL-OSI Submissions

Source: Office of the Ombudsman
A new report from New Zealand’s Independent Monitoring Mechanism (IMM) highlights the realities and challenges disabled people faced during the COVID-19 emergency.
At the centre of this report are the stories of disabled people as they lived through this troubling time.
These stories have shown resilience, strength, and commitment. Some stories have been distressing, others demonstrate caring and inventive responses.
The Disability Convention requires signatory governments to protect and promote the rights of disabled people. In particular, Article 11 requires governments to uphold disability rights in situations of risk and emergency, and put in place measures to protect and ensure the safety of disabled people.
Making Disability Rights Real in a Pandemic provides recommendations for future pandemic planning to ensure New Zealand is well equipped to guarantee disabled people’s rights are upheld during future humanitarian emergencies.
While the report tells of some positive experiences, it also notes that the restrictions imposed under various Alert Levels highlighted, and exacerbated, some existing inequities in disabled people’s enjoyment of human rights.
However, there are also instances of greater connectedness, of collegiality, and a sense of more inclusive community.
The report strongly recommends collaboration in decision making with tāngata whaikaha Māori (disabled Māori). The report also makes 23 other recommendations across seven sectors – access to essential goods, services, and spaces; decision making, participation, and data; access to information and communications; education; health; work and employment; and access to justice and disabled people in places of detention.

First Responders – Middleton chemical spill update

Source: MIL-OSI Submissions

Source: Fire and Emergency New Zealand
Fire and Emergency New Zealand is attending a chemical spill in Middleton, Christchurch.
Crews were called to the scene at 12.35pm this afternoon.
On arrival they found 1000L of nitric acid had been spilt.
Working with police, a cordon was put up around the area. The cordon is still currently in place.
The spill is now contained. We currently have 25 personnel in attendance, who are working to clean up the remainder of the spill.
They are doing this by applying a neutralising agent.
We are expecting to be there for the rest of the day.

Victims of Hawera homicide named

Arrest - Upper Hutt burglaries

Source: New Zealand Police (District News)

The identities of the two victims of Monday’s homicide in Hawera can now be confirmed by Police.

They are Regan Frost-Lawn, 15, and Stephen John Frost, 55.

The Police investigation is continuing and includes an ongoing scene examination at a Hawera property.

Post mortems commenced on Tuesday.

A 21-year-old has man has been charged with their murders and is due to reappear in the New Plymouth High Court on 9 February. He has interim name suppression.

ENDS

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Road closed – serious crash, Pongakawa

Arrest - Upper Hutt burglaries

Source: New Zealand Police (District News)

Road closed – serious crash, Pongakawa

SH2 near Wharere and Te Puke East Roads will be closed for a few hours following a serious crash.

Motorists are asked to avoid the area or expect delays.

Diversions are in place.

ENDS

Issued by Police Media Centre

Investments – Guardians publishes white paper on the 2020 Reference Portfolio Review

Source: MIL-OSI Submissions
Source: New Zealand Superannuation Fund

The Guardians of New Zealand Superannuation, the Crown entity that manages the NZ Super Fund, has published a white paper documenting the outcome of its 2020 review of the Fund’s Reference Portfolio.

The Reference Portfolio is the basis on which the majority of the Fund is invested, and represents the single biggest driver of Fund returns. It is designed to gain broad, low cost access to listed global investment markets, in order to maximise the Fund’s returns without undue risk to the Fund as a whole. It is also a benchmark for active investment.

The review reaffirmed the Reference Portfolio’s strong weighting towards growth assets, retaining an 80% allocation to growth assets (equities) and 20% to fixed income assets (bonds). An existing 5% allocation to listed New Zealand equities also remains unchanged. There has been a minor change to the structuring of the global equities exposure within the Reference Portfolio. Further details are contained in the paper.

The Guardians expects that over the long-term the Reference Portfolio will return 6.8%, 2.8% above the estimated risk free (Treasury Bill) interest rate, a proxy for the cost to the Government to contribute to the Fund.

The Reference Portfolio will next be reviewed in 2025.

The paper is the latest in a series that provides insights into how the Guardians invests the NZ Super Fund. It can be downloaded here: Papers/Reports/Reviews.

Environment – Advisory: New Zealand continues to disregard biodiversity targets, lobbies for more bottom trawling

Source: MIL-OSI Submissions

Source: Greenpeace
Wednesday, 20 Jan: New Zealand is fast developing a reputation as a South Pacific vandal, says Greenpeace, as the government continues to fight against increased ocean protection.
At the upcoming meeting of the South Pacific Regional Fisheries Management Organisation (SPRFMO), starting on January 26, the New Zealand delegation looks set to stand alone in arguing for minimal protection of seamounts, which are important biodiversity hotspots.
New Zealand will also argue to increase orange roughy catch, a slow-growing fish species caught through bottom trawling.
The New Zealand delegation, as per their submissions ahead of the meeting, will argue that bottom trawl fishing should be allowed to continue as-is, even though it’s known to destroy deep-sea corals and other vulnerable marine life.
Other nations at the meeting, including Australia, will be pushing for tightened rules to prevent some of the damage from bottom trawling, and are also backing a review of bottom trawling rules in 2022.
In contrast, New Zealand has made one conservation proposal, to ban bottom trawling in areas deeper than 1,400m. In reality, trawlers do not fish below 1,250m, so this rule would do nothing to stop bottom trawling damage.
Greenpeace has described this proposal as “meaningless greenwash.”
The government promised to prosecute Talley’s to avoid them being blacklisted, but two and a half years later, prosecution of the company has not been completed. Talley’s vessels have continued to bottom trawl the South Pacific Ocean since.
Jessica Desmond, oceans campaigner at Greenpeace, says New Zealanders are tired of hearing how our government is failing to protect the oceans, and that they want to see action.
“There has been a pattern of New Zealand governments putting industry over oceans protections both domestically and in these South Pacific meetings,” she says,
“New Zealanders are over it. It remains to be seen if the new government and Minister for Oceans and Fisheries will take this in hand, and ensure marine biodiversity is protected for all.”

Education – Pilot of new NCEA subject a significant step towards parity for Māori knowledge

Source: MIL-OSI Submissions

Source: Ministry of Education
More than 30 secondary schools and kura across the country will be piloting the new Māori Performing Arts subject at all NCEA levels and for University Entrance this school year, marking a significant step towards ensuring parity for Māori knowledge in our education system, said Ellen MacGregor-Reid, the Deputy Secretary, Early Learning and Student Achievement.
Around 900 students in both English-medium and Māori-medium education settings will be studying Te Ao Haka, as the new Māori Performing Arts subject is called, earning credits towards their NCEA this year.
“This is a significant step in our efforts to ensure Māori knowledge, culture and approaches to learning are valued, recognised and supported in accordance with the Government’s obligations under the Treaty of Waitangi, and to enable all young New Zealanders to choose from a full range of pathways to further study or work,” Ms MacGregor-Reid said.
“Through this and other changes being made to NCEA, we are demonstrating the Government’s commitment to ensure the education system delivers for all and supports every young New Zealander to succeed.”
Te Ao Haka is a performance-based art form grounded in knowledge of Māori culture, language and identity. Students of Te Ao Haka develop a range of skills and qualities (including interpretive and communication skills, leadership, and lateral and critical thinking) that can support them with a strong foundation to pursue further studies or career pathways, and enhance their life skills.
Ms MacGregor-Reid said the introduction of Te Ao Haka was among a number of changes seeking to enhance the learning pathways available for students and to ensure the knowledge that is gained is recognised as valuable.
“The changes address recommendations, made during the 2018 review of NCEA, that te reo Māori, tikanga Māori (Māori way of doing things), and mātauranga Māori (Māori knowledge) are valued and supported in the curriculum and NCEA in the same way as English language and culture,” she said.
As part of the NCEA Change Package, the Government committed to develop new ways to recognise mātauranga Māori, build teacher capability, and improve resourcing and support for Māori learners.
In line with this, draft NCEA Level 1 materials for Te Reo Māori and seven wāhanga ako or learning areas aligned to Te Marautanga o Aotearoa (TMoA), the Māori-medium curriculum, have been developed so far and were released today for public feedback (closing 20 February 2021).
Following feedback, the TMoA-derived subjects at NCEA Level 1 will be piloted in 2022. They are expected to be available for all kura and wharekura to start delivering in the 2023 school year. TMoA materials for NCEA Levels 2 and 3 will follow a similar process, with piloting in 2023.
-The Ministry of Education continues to develop the subjects derived from Te Marautanga ō Aotearoa (TMoA), the Māori medium curriculum. At Level 1, the subjects are Pāngarau (Maths and numeracy), Hauora (Health and well-being), Pūtaiao (Sciences), Te Reo Rangatira (study of Te Reo Māori), Tikanga-ā-iwi (Social Sciences), Hangarau (Technology) and Ngā Toi (The Arts). Further subjects are also under consideration and will be announced from April 2021.
-Following the introduction in 2008 of TMoA, the first curriculum uniquely developed for Māori-medium settings, the Ministry began developing achievement standards derived from TMoA for Māori-medium settings. Previously, Māori-medium settings used translations of achievement standards derived from The New Zealand Curriculum (NZC) when NCEA was introduced in 2002.
-The current NCEA achievement standards, derived from TMoA, were rolled out between 2014 and 2017. However, support resources have been limited so kaiako continued to use English-medium achievement standards and support resources from the NZC.
-There are around 50 Māori-medium schools and wharekura that deliver TMoA curriculum in te reo Māori at least 50 per cent of the time.

Serious crash – Pongakawa

Arrest - Upper Hutt burglaries

Source: New Zealand Police (District News)

Police are at the scene of a serious multi vehicle crash in Pongakawa, Western Bay of Plenty.

Emergency services were alerted to the crash on Wharere and Te Puke East Roads at around 4pm.

A number of people have serious injuries. Helicopters have been dispatched.

Diversions are in place. Motorists are asked to avoid the area and expect delays.

ENDS

Issued by Police Media Centre