Road closures, Octagon, Dunedin

Road closures, Octagon, Dunedin

Source: New Zealand Police (District News)

Road closures are in place around the Octagon in Dunedin following a fire at St Paul’s Cathedral.

Closures are in place on Stuart Street, from Moray Place at the top end of the Octagon to the centre of the Octagon, and on Moray Place from Filleul Street to Stuart Street.

Motorists should avoid the area or expect delays.

ENDS

Issued by Police Media Centre

UC Connect: Earthquakes + Innovation = Resilience

UC Connect: Earthquakes + Innovation = Resilience

Source: University of Canterbury – statements

10 August 2020

University of Canterbury (UC) Engineering technology is being used to quake-proof buildings, build the “Ferrari of bridges”, and predict the future in order to save lives in these shaky isles and around the world.

An expert panel will discuss how they helped to engineer world-first quake-resilient buildings and structures, in an upcoming free UC Connect public talk on the evening of Wednesday 12 August.

The upcoming talk, UC Connect: Earthquakes + Innovation = Resilience will feature three revolutionary, award-winning UC academics – Distinguished Professor Geoff Chase, Professor Geoff Rodgers and Professor Alessandro Palermo. Each professor will highlight a different aspect of structural earthquake engineering advances made and lessons learnt, following the Canterbury earthquakes. Their talks will include an overview of some of the new resilient structures built using their novel solutions, such as state-of-the-art seismic dampers, and techniques, like in-silico “virtual buildings”, helping to engineer a more resilient future.

My area: Energy dissipation to enable and support low-damage seismic design

“The ability to create buildings that are more resilient to large earthquakes is the goal of academic researchers as well as practicing engineers. In lieu of damage to structural members and contents, we need to provide alternative forms of energy dissipation to damp building motion and absorb the significant energy imparted into a building during a large earthquake. A suite of different energy dissipation and bracing elements have been developed to enable a broad range of potential applications in different structures. I will speak on the deployment of UC research outcomes in three different buildings – two within the Christchurch CBD rebuild (Forté Health and Tūranga central public library) and one in San Francisco (Casa Adelante affordable housing) in the United States. As well as being a fantastic public asset and a focal point of the rebuilt Christchurch CBD, the Tūranga library building has won numerous industry awards for the resilient seismic design. Likewise, despite being a tightly budgeted community housing project for low-income, senior and formerly homeless residents of San Francisco’s Mission District, Casa Adelante’s careful design and innovative thinking by the design engineers has produced a building awarded a US Resiliency Council Gold Rating for Seismic Performance. My talk will cover all three projects where the UC-developed dampers have been used, covering some of the drivers for uptake and innovative designs to achieve resilience.”

My area: Low-damage design and cost-effective connection detailing for buildings and bridges. 

“The 2010-11 Canterbury quakes and 2016 Kaikōura earthquake highlighted difficulties in assessing and selecting the fastest, most cost-effective repair philosophy for damaged concrete bridges. After the Kaikoura quakes, over 300 bridges were assessed by authorities. One bridge almost collapsed and was replaced by a Bailey bridge, while several others near the epicentre sustained fractured rebar and massive concrete damage. Bridges adopting low-damage design are a viable alternative to seismic isolation and integrate perfectly with accelerated construction techniques which are becoming popular in high-density built environments. This presentation gives an overview of outcomes of an extensive experimental study at the University of Canterbury on different types of repairable bridge and timber connections and large-scale specimens. We’ll look at real-world applications, including the world’s first implementation on a 100-metre motorway overpass, the Wigram-Magdala bridge link which opened in 2016 – and why it’s the award-winning “Ferrari of bridges”.

My area: Monitoring performance and predicting the future for resilience

“In February 2011, the seven-storey CTV building collapsed, causing 115 deaths. Our inability to adequately monitor structural damage, and thus to assess how badly a structure is damaged is a leading reason why the building was occupied that day. This part of the talk presents recent world-leading UC research on monitoring structural damage with low-cost sensors to assess damage and inform critical decision-making. It shows how this work can be extended into creating in-silico “virtual buildings” to accurately predict what would happen under the next earthquake. These breakthroughs provide foundation technology solutions for optimising earthquake preparedness and response, and creating extremely resilient future cities.”

UC Connect public lecture: UC Connect: Earthquakes + Innovation = Resilience, presented by professors Geoff Rodgers, Geoff Chase and Alessandro Palermo, UC Engineering, 7pm – 8.30pm, Wednesday 12 August in C1 lecture theatre in C-Block, Ilam campus, Christchurch. Register to attend free: www.canterbury.ac.nz/ucconnect

For further information please contact:

UC Communications team, media@canterbury.ac.nz, Ph: (03) 369 3631 or 027 503 0168

UC Connect: Earthquakes + Innovation = Resilience

Data challenge sums up UC’s business leadership talent

Source: University of Canterbury – statements

10 August 2020

University of Canterbury (UC) Engineering technology is being used to quake-proof buildings, build the “Ferrari of bridges”, and predict the future in order to save lives in these shaky isles and around the world.

An expert panel will discuss how they helped to engineer world-first quake-resilient buildings and structures, in an upcoming free UC Connect public talk on the evening of Wednesday 12 August.

The upcoming talk, UC Connect: Earthquakes + Innovation = Resilience will feature three revolutionary, award-winning UC academics – Distinguished Professor Geoff Chase, Professor Geoff Rodgers and Professor Alessandro Palermo. Each professor will highlight a different aspect of structural earthquake engineering advances made and lessons learnt, following the Canterbury earthquakes. Their talks will include an overview of some of the new resilient structures built using their novel solutions, such as state-of-the-art seismic dampers, and techniques, like in-silico “virtual buildings”, helping to engineer a more resilient future.

My area: Energy dissipation to enable and support low-damage seismic design

“The ability to create buildings that are more resilient to large earthquakes is the goal of academic researchers as well as practicing engineers. In lieu of damage to structural members and contents, we need to provide alternative forms of energy dissipation to damp building motion and absorb the significant energy imparted into a building during a large earthquake. A suite of different energy dissipation and bracing elements have been developed to enable a broad range of potential applications in different structures. I will speak on the deployment of UC research outcomes in three different buildings – two within the Christchurch CBD rebuild (Forté Health and Tūranga central public library) and one in San Francisco (Casa Adelante affordable housing) in the United States. As well as being a fantastic public asset and a focal point of the rebuilt Christchurch CBD, the Tūranga library building has won numerous industry awards for the resilient seismic design. Likewise, despite being a tightly budgeted community housing project for low-income, senior and formerly homeless residents of San Francisco’s Mission District, Casa Adelante’s careful design and innovative thinking by the design engineers has produced a building awarded a US Resiliency Council Gold Rating for Seismic Performance. My talk will cover all three projects where the UC-developed dampers have been used, covering some of the drivers for uptake and innovative designs to achieve resilience.”

My area: Low-damage design and cost-effective connection detailing for buildings and bridges. 

“The 2010-11 Canterbury quakes and 2016 Kaikōura earthquake highlighted difficulties in assessing and selecting the fastest, most cost-effective repair philosophy for damaged concrete bridges. After the Kaikoura quakes, over 300 bridges were assessed by authorities. One bridge almost collapsed and was replaced by a Bailey bridge, while several others near the epicentre sustained fractured rebar and massive concrete damage. Bridges adopting low-damage design are a viable alternative to seismic isolation and integrate perfectly with accelerated construction techniques which are becoming popular in high-density built environments. This presentation gives an overview of outcomes of an extensive experimental study at the University of Canterbury on different types of repairable bridge and timber connections and large-scale specimens. We’ll look at real-world applications, including the world’s first implementation on a 100-metre motorway overpass, the Wigram-Magdala bridge link which opened in 2016 – and why it’s the award-winning “Ferrari of bridges”.

My area: Monitoring performance and predicting the future for resilience

“In February 2011, the seven-storey CTV building collapsed, causing 115 deaths. Our inability to adequately monitor structural damage, and thus to assess how badly a structure is damaged is a leading reason why the building was occupied that day. This part of the talk presents recent world-leading UC research on monitoring structural damage with low-cost sensors to assess damage and inform critical decision-making. It shows how this work can be extended into creating in-silico “virtual buildings” to accurately predict what would happen under the next earthquake. These breakthroughs provide foundation technology solutions for optimising earthquake preparedness and response, and creating extremely resilient future cities.”

UC Connect public lecture: UC Connect: Earthquakes + Innovation = Resilience, presented by professors Geoff Rodgers, Geoff Chase and Alessandro Palermo, UC Engineering, 7pm – 8.30pm, Wednesday 12 August in C1 lecture theatre in C-Block, Ilam campus, Christchurch. Register to attend free: www.canterbury.ac.nz/ucconnect

For further information please contact:

UC Communications team, media@canterbury.ac.nz, Ph: (03) 369 3631 or 027 503 0168

Data challenge sums up UC’s business leadership talent

Data challenge sums up UC’s business leadership talent

Source: University of Canterbury – statements

10 August 2020

University of Canterbury (UC) Masters students showed off their skills in a competition that challenged them to use data to solve problems and develop business savvy strategies.

  • Team Subway were awarded a $6,000 prize for their data driven initiative to attract highly skilled tech professionals to Christchurch as part of the hi-tech supernode challenge.

With high-profile judges including IBM New Zealand Chief Executive Mike Smith, UC Vice-Chancellor Professor Cheryl de la Rey, and ChristchurchNZ Chief Executive Joanna Norris, the UC Masters in Business Administration Insight Initiative Challenge (2IC) was a chance for participants to use the knowledge they have gained from the new six-week course to respond to industry-based tasks.

The key industries covered were food and fibre and advanced manufacturing supernodes, and local business attraction. The challenge questions were set by economic development agency ChristchurchNZ.

UC signed a memorandum of understanding with ChristchurchNZ recently expressing the University’s commitment to growing its impact on the development of the city, Professor de la Rey says.

“The ideas were innovative and engaging and the presentations were convincing. The timing of the 2IC coincides with the recent MoU signing between UC and ChristchurchNZ and it shows how we can do more when we come together.”

Nine teams competed for three “Sebastian and Fernando” prizes of $12,000 in total sponsored by UC MBA Data Informed Strategy course facilitators, Isuru Fernando from Google NZ and Arun Sebastian, who is Chief Financial Officer for IBM New Zealand.

Team Subway won the challenge with their data driven initiative to attract highly skilled tech professionals to Christchurch as part of the hi-tech supernode challenge.

Elle Archer, Managing Director of ELG Global – a SMART Development company and a member of the winning team, says 2IC tested the team in collaborative design thinking.

“We worked hard, we prepped harder, and we were pleased with the results. We were not in it to win a prize, we were passionate about creating a sound concept that the city of Christchurch could utilise in boosting our economy, employment, and partnerships.

“UC is leading the way with this new MBA, and our hopes are that we come away with the tools we need to be business leaders, for today, and tomorrow.”

Team Aices were runners-up with their solution to tackle Canterbury’s manufacturing challenges and Team Hi-Tech Christchurch won the “Wow” factor prize positioning telehealth as a local business growth opportunity for Christchurch.

Smith, also a UC MBA graduate, says all of the teams were amazing and covered a lot of ground especially in proposing solutions to the challenge of data aggregations within and across industries.

Norris says she will be able to draw useful insights from many of the solutions she saw over the weekend.

“The teams did well to identify local capabilities and strengths in Canterbury and leverage these in areas where this are global growth opportunities. You are the leaders of the future.”

MBA Director Associate Professor Chris Vas says the 2IC was an intensive experience that challenged students and was a fitting finale for the newly launched Data Informed Strategy course, which has had invaluable input from industry leaders.

“The participants are people who already have extensive business or scholarly experience so there is an incredibly high standard. This weekend really tested their skills and showed what they’ve learned about the technologies and analytic approaches that can be used to convert data into insights that will solve problems and create strategy.”

For further information please contact:

UC Communications

  • All media enquiries are directed to the UC Communications team.
  • Email media@canterbury.ac.nz for media enquiries (business hours, Monday – Friday)
  • Call 03 369 3631 for media enquiries (business hours, Monday – Friday)
  • Call 027 503 0168 for urgent media enquiries (after-hours, Monday – Sunday)

Tweet UC @UCNZ and follow UC on Facebook

ThincLab Canterbury benefits region while thinking globally

ThincLab Canterbury benefits region while thinking globally

Source: University of Canterbury – statements

10 August 2020

Christchurch is already seeing the benefits of a memorandum of understanding between the University of Canterbury (UC) and ChristchurchNZ, through an additional agreement with UC’s Centre for Entrepreneurship (UCE) to deliver various programmes, including ThincLab Canterbury.

The three-year agreement will give Christchurch businesses access to UC’s exceptional student and academic talent, impactful research and development opportunities. UC students will benefit from working with companies through internships and projects as well as being able to see the real-world impact their work and research can have on society.

ThincLab Canterbury, part of Callaghan Innovation’s National Founder Incubator and ThincLab networks, is one part of the agreement to jointly develop an innovative ecosystem in Christchurch to grow our most ambitious local startups, and the commercialisation of research.

Dr Rachel Wright, Director of UCE and ThincLab Canterbury programme director, says Canterbury is in a unique position to authentically brand itself as a city of innovation and entrepreneurship, and attract talent to power a dynamic ecosystem focussed on the city’s supernode strategy.

“COVID-19 has given us an opportunity to grow jobs and reposition Christchurch as an innovative and agile city ready and able to respond to changes in our business environment,” Dr Wright says.

“Together the partnership will lead to more engagement with our business community, new innovations and build Canterbury’s capability, attracting new business and experts to the region and creating jobs.”

“The ThincLab incubator will act like an ‘engine room’ to support high-growth startups that back ChristchurchNZ’s strategy and connect investors, mentors, commercial partners and government agencies,” she says.

The network provides startup companies with space to work and access to mentors and investors in Australia, Singapore and Europe. It also provides joint programmes and webinars with partners and in time, students and members of the ThincLab incubator will be able to take advantage of in-situ opportunities to learn about international markets.

Three student startups developing under ThincLab Canterbury already benefitting from the partnership include Vxt, Zincovery and Kea Aerospace.

Vxt, co-founded by Luke Campbell and Lucy Turner, have created a mobile app that uses artificial intelligence to help manage and automate voice messages. Vxt successfully launched in Australia in February and the USA in July this year.

Zincovery, the brainchild of Jonathan Ring and Associate Professor Aaron Marshall, is focused on recycling spent acid and recovering pure zinc – a true leap forward towards a cleaner global future for industries reliant on galvanising.

Kea Aerospace, co-founded by Dr Philipp Sueltrop, and Mark Rocket (early investor in Rocket Lab) is building the largest unmanned solar powered aircraft (wingspace 32 metres) in the southern hemisphere to capture high resolution aerial images over large areas that will provide much needed information to transform precision agriculture, environmental monitoring and disaster management.

For more information or to request an interview, contact:

Director of Centre for Entrepreneurship Rachel Wright, University of Canterbury, Rachel.wright@canterbury.ac.nz, phone: 03 369 3403.

Or
UC Communications team, media@canterbury.ac.nz, Ph: (03) 369 3631 or 027 503 0168

ThincLab Canterbury benefits region while thinking globally

ThincLab Canterbury benefits region while thinking globally

Source: University of Canterbury – statements

10 August 2020

Christchurch is already seeing the benefits of a memorandum of understanding between the University of Canterbury (UC) and ChristchurchNZ, through an additional agreement with UC’s Centre for Entrepreneurship (UCE) to deliver various programmes, including ThincLab Canterbury.

The three-year agreement will give Christchurch businesses access to UC’s exceptional student and academic talent, impactful research and development opportunities. UC students will benefit from working with companies through internships and projects as well as being able to see the real-world impact their work and research can have on society.

ThincLab Canterbury, part of Callaghan Innovation’s National Founder Incubator and ThincLab networks, is one part of the agreement to jointly develop an innovative ecosystem in Christchurch to grow our most ambitious local startups, and the commercialisation of research.

Dr Rachel Wright, Director of UCE and ThincLab Canterbury programme director, says Canterbury is in a unique position to authentically brand itself as a city of innovation and entrepreneurship, and attract talent to power a dynamic ecosystem focussed on the city’s supernode strategy.

“COVID-19 has given us an opportunity to grow jobs and reposition Christchurch as an innovative and agile city ready and able to respond to changes in our business environment,” Dr Wright says.

“Together the partnership will lead to more engagement with our business community, new innovations and build Canterbury’s capability, attracting new business and experts to the region and creating jobs.”

“The ThincLab incubator will act like an ‘engine room’ to support high-growth startups that back ChristchurchNZ’s strategy and connect investors, mentors, commercial partners and government agencies,” she says.

The network provides startup companies with space to work and access to mentors and investors in Australia, Singapore and Europe. It also provides joint programmes and webinars with partners and in time, students and members of the ThincLab incubator will be able to take advantage of in-situ opportunities to learn about international markets.

Three student startups developing under ThincLab Canterbury already benefitting from the partnership include Vxt, Zincovery and Kea Aerospace.

Vxt, co-founded by Luke Campbell and Lucy Turner, have created a mobile app that uses artificial intelligence to help manage and automate voice messages. Vxt successfully launched in Australia in February and the USA in July this year.

Zincovery, the brainchild of Jonathan Ring and Associate Professor Aaron Marshall, is focused on recycling spent acid and recovering pure zinc – a true leap forward towards a cleaner global future for industries reliant on galvanising.

Kea Aerospace, co-founded by Dr Philipp Sueltrop, and Mark Rocket (early investor in Rocket Lab) is building the largest unmanned solar powered aircraft (wingspace 32 metres) in the southern hemisphere to capture high resolution aerial images over large areas that will provide much needed information to transform precision agriculture, environmental monitoring and disaster management.

For more information or to request an interview, contact:

Director of Centre for Entrepreneurship Rachel Wright, University of Canterbury, Rachel.wright@canterbury.ac.nz, phone: 03 369 3403.

Or
UC Communications team, media@canterbury.ac.nz, Ph: (03) 369 3631 or 027 503 0168

Look Closer: Celebrating Conservation Week through a 2020 lens | Conservation blog

Look Closer: Celebrating Conservation Week through a 2020 lens | Conservation blog

Source: Department of Conservation

The way we experience nature has changed since last Conservation Week.

2020 has changed us and placed a greater emphasis on our connection to nature as a way to boost our wellbeing.

During the COVID-19 lockdown, many of us found solace in the moments we were able to spend in nature (close to home, of course; both virtually and in our own backyards). We slowed down. We spent more time with our whānau.

This year, the theme for Conservation Week is Nature Through New Eyes.

Immerse yourself in nature and look closer with a fresh perspective on Aotearoa’s natural spaces and unique wildlife. Papatūānuku’s wellbeing is our wellbeing.

Engage online, at events or with activities, or by exploring your own backyard and embracing what’s always been there; look, listen, breathe and feel. Here are a few ideas for how you can celebrate Conservation Week this year.

Capture a macro nature photo

A macro photo is a close-up that captures the detail of the subject – it’s all about capturing the little details and appreciating what we wouldn’t normally notice. Plus, you could win a Canon camera and accessories worth over $4.5k by entering our #NatureThroughNewEyes Instagram competition.

To be in it to win it, take and share a macro photo on Instagram showcasing New Zealand’s nature by the end of Conservation Week – Sunday, 23rd August 2020. You can take this with a camera or a smart phone.

Upload your image to Instagram using the hashtag #NatureThroughNewEyes and tag @docgovtnz. Learn more about the competition and how to enter.

Check out some of the amazing entries so far:

Get your conservation quiz on

Take the challenge during Conservation Week and quiz yourself (and everyone you know) on all things conservation. Each weekday of Conservation Week, starting on Monday, 17th August, we’ll release a new set of conservation-related quiz questions on both our website and Instagram Stories. Follow along and see if you can beat last year’s score.

Macro photography of a Kawakawa. Photo: Te Papa

Boost your wellbeing with a digital experience

Survey findings from the Mental Health Foundation of New Zealand reveal that spending time in nature positively impacts the mental health of New Zealanders.

Improve your focus, mood, and immune system by either spending time in the great outdoors, or the next best thing: immersing yourself in a virtual experience.

These virtual experiences were created with support from Natural History New Zealand (NHNZ), best viewed with your headphones in.

Learn the history of Conservation Week

Conservation Week is a chance to do something – big or small – to create change and celebrate the unique wildlife of Aotearoa. But it’s not all about attending events or doing conservation activities, it’s about connecting with nature and helping to take care of it.

The first Conservation Week was launched in 1969 by the New Zealand Scout Association, with the goal to promote interest in the environment and encourage participating in protecting it. It wasn’t until 1987 – when the Department of Conservation was formed – that we started running Conservation Week as it is today. Learn more about the origins behind Conservation Week from last year’s 50th anniversary.

The iconic 1974 poster by Friedensreich Hundertwasser

Start conversations about conservation

Whether it’s with your whānau, your work mates, or your social media following, you can play a part in spreading the message of Conservation Week.

The theme for 2020 is Nature Through New Eyes. This means reflecting on the impact nature has on our wellbeing, embracing what’s already been there, and inspiring others to learn more about Aotearoa’s unique native species and environments.

You can support conservation on your own social media channels:

  • Use the hashtag #ConservationWeek
  • Tag us using @docgovtnz in your Instagram content
  • Encourage your followers to look at nature through new eyes
Macro image of a Whio. Photo: Kayla Wilde

For more on how you can get involved in Conservation Week from this Saturday, 15th August to Sunday, 23rd August, head over to our Activities page or search for a local event you can attend.

Make sure to be following us on social for all the updates during the week – including a daily weekday quiz on our Instagram Stories.

Name release – fatal crash, Morrinsville

Road closures, Octagon, Dunedin

Source: New Zealand Police (District News)

Police can now confirm the name of the motorcyclist who died following a collision between a motorcycle and a ute on Piako Road on the 4th of August.

He was James Darryl Houghton, 21-years-old of Morrinsville.

Police extend their sympathies to his family and friends.

Enquiries into the crash are ongoing.

ENDS

Issued by the Police Media Centre

Northland motorists asked to take care ahead of heavy rain, strong winds

Source: New Zealand Transport Agency

Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency is urging motorists to take care ahead of heavy rain and strong winds forecast for Northland from tonight.

A deep low to the west of Northland has seen Metservice issue a Heavy Rain warning from 11pm tonight to 5pm tomorrow for Northland. There is also a Strong Wind Watch from 8am to 5pm tomorrow (Tuesday).

Northland System Manager Jacqui Hori-Hoult says motorists should expect the unexpected and drive with care.

“Avoid unnecessary travel and take care.

“With the ground still saturated from the floods last month, heavy rain may cause streams and rivers to rise rapidly. Surface flooding and slips are also possible and driving conditions may be hazardous.

“Drive to the conditions and watch out for surface flooding, slips and fallen trees or branches. Check your intended route for hazards or disruptions before setting out, using the Transport Agency’s Journey Planner website, and remain alert for unreported hazards.”

High sided vehicles and motorcycles should take particular care in strong winds.

Ms Hori-Hoult asks motorists to be mindful of contractors who could be out clearing hazards off the road, and drive slowly through work sites.

“We want to see everyone get home safely. Stay safe and stay alert.”

Plan ahead for a safe, enjoyable journey. Keep up to date with:

Missing person – Kumeu

Road closures, Octagon, Dunedin

Source: New Zealand Police (District News)

Police are appealing to the public to help locate Rita Morarji, who went missing from an address in Kumeu last month.

The 30-year-old left the address shortly before 7pm on July 20 and has not returned since.

Police have made a number of extensive enquiries to locate her and are now appealing to the public to help.

Her family and Police are concerned for her welfare and want to make sure she is safe, so are asking anyone who has seen her to contact Police immediately.

Rita is described as 160cm tall and of small build with long dark hair, and was last seen wearing a black jacket with grey pants and brown jandals.

She was also reportedly seen about 7.30pm on Ash Street, Avondale, on July 27th, heading towards the walkway that leads to Segedin Esplanade Reserve.

Anyone with information about her whereabouts is urged to call Police on 105 quoting file number 200720/5504.

If you see her please call 111.

ENDS

Adriana Weber/NZ Police