Huge Plans for Tauranga and New Zealand Film

Source: Press Release Service – Press Release/Statement:

Headline: Huge Plans for Tauranga and New Zealand Film

Owner and Founder of the Apex Academy of Performing Arts, Harry Oram, made a big announcement this past weekend for Tauranga and the Bay of Plenty during the first Apex Academy Red Carpet Premiere held on April 10th at United Cinemas Bayfair.

– –

NZ becomes first in world for climate reporting

NZ becomes first in world for climate reporting

Source: New Zealand Government

Commerce and Consumer Affairs Minister David Clark says Aotearoa New Zealand has become the first country in the world to introduce a law that requires the financial sector to disclose the impacts of climate change on their business and explain how they will manage climate-related risks and opportunities.

The Financial Sector (Climate-related Disclosure and Other Matters) Amendment Bill has been introduced to Parliament and will receive its first reading this week.

“It is important that every part of New Zealand’s economy is helping  us cut emissions and transition to a low carbon future This legislation ensures that financial organisations disclose and ultimately take action against climate-related risks and opportunities,

“Becoming the first country in the world to introduce a law like this means we have an opportunity to show real leadership and pave the way for other countries to make climate-related disclosures mandatory,” said David Clark.

Climate Change Minister James Shaw said the law was another step towards a climate-friendly, prosperous future for New Zealand.

“Climate change will have a profound impact on businesses all over Aotearoa New Zealand. There are activities and assets that these businesses are involved in that will not hold their value in a low carbon world, simply because they emit too much climate pollution and contribute to the climate crisis.

“Similarly, there are technologies and activities that will cut emissions and become hugely valuable to the low carbon economy of the future.

“Requiring the financial sector to disclose the impacts of climate change will help businesses identify the high-emitting activities that pose a risk to their future prosperity, as well as the opportunities presented by action on climate change and new low carbon technologies, James Shaw said.

The Bill will make climate-related disclosures mandatory for around 200 organisations, including most listed issuers, large registered banks, licensed insurers and managers of investment schemes.

Once passed, disclosures will be required for financial years commencing in 2022, meaning that the first disclosures will be made in 2023.

“One way of reading the Climate Change Commission’s draft advice is as a warning that high-carbon investments will be increasingly risky as we get closer to meeting the Government’s climate targets,” James Shaw said.

“We simply cannot get to net-zero carbon emissions by 2050 unless the financial sector knows what impact their investments are having on the climate. This law will bring climate risks and resilience into the heart of financial and business decision making.”

Reporting will be based on the Task Force on Climate-related Financial Disclosures (TCFD) framework, which is widely acknowledged as international best practice.

“Many businesses face significant physical and transitional risks relating to climate change, and while some businesses have started publishing reports about how climate change may affect their business, strategies and financial position, there is still a long way to go,” said David Clark.

Notes to Editor

There are four main elements to the Bill:

  • It introduces mandatory climate-related disclosures for most listed issuers, along with large registered banks, licensed insurers and registered managers of investment schemes.
  • It requires the disclosures to be made in accordance with climate standards that will be issued by the External Reporting Board, or XRB.
  • The Financial Markets Authority will be responsible for the independent monitoring and enforcement of the relevant reporting entities’ compliance with the new reporting standards.
  • The XRB will be able to issue guidance material on environmental, social and governance reporting and other wider aspects of non-financial reporting.

More information available at: https://www.mbie.govt.nz/business-and-employment/business/regulating-entities/mandatory-climate-related-financial-disclosures

ACC’s policy of not covering birth injuries is one more sign the system is overdue for reform

ACC’s policy of not covering birth injuries is one more sign the system is overdue for reform

Source: University of Waikato

Recent media coverage of women not being able to get treatment for birth injuries highlights yet another example of gender bias in healthcare in New Zealand.

Following a policy review, the Accident Compensation Corporation (ACC), which covers accidental injuries, has restricted access to compensation for women who suffer perineal tears during birth.

ACC’s policy appears gender neutral as it focuses on injuries caused by treatment. It states that most perineal tears are caused by the birthing process itself, and are therefore not covered.

In 2020, the Ministry of Health, drawing from overseas research, noted that 60-85% of women suffer some form of perineal tearing while giving birth. Overseas research also shows the number of women experiencing the most severe tears is small but growing.

The debate is multi-faceted, but there are domestic and international legal obligations ACC should take into account.

Equal rights to health

In terms of international law, the United Nations Charter 1945 reaffirms the equal rights of men and women. So, too, does the Universal Declaration of Human Rights 1948. The International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights 1966 (CESCR) and the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights 1966 (CCPR) both affirm the equal rights of men and women.

The declaration and both covenants also prohibit discrimination on the basis of sex. Rights to equality and non-discrimination are also the subject of the UN Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women 1979 (CEDAW).

The right to the highest attainable standard of health is underpinned by the rights to equality and non-discrimination. The right to health is a human right and extends to reproductive and sexual health, a right that women should enjoy without discrimination.




Read more:
Gender bias in medicine and medical research is still putting women’s health at risk


The New Zealand Bill of Rights Act 1990 stipulates that everyone has the right to be free from discrimination, and that any limitations on this right must be reasonable and justifiable. The Human Rights Act 1993 prohibits discrimination on the grounds of sex, which includes pregnancy and childbirth. This law also prohibits indirect discrimination, meaning laws or policies that appear not to discriminate, but in practice do, are unlawful unless there is a good reason for them.

This legal framework must form part of the reasoning for ACC’s policy towards women (and babies) who suffer birth injuries. The current view is that only those who suffer birth injuries as a result of treatment, or failure to provide treatment, are covered.

ACC’s justification is that it is a more accurate interpretation of the compensation scheme, and that it provides certainty to decision makers.

Accident compensation favours male-dominated professions

ACC’s approach may be driven by the understandable desire to provide certainty, but the policy change has led to a drastic drop in the number of eligible women.

Women whose birth injuries do not meet ACC’s requirements can access treatment through the public health system, which satisfies New Zealand’s obligations around the right to health. But availability of such treatment does not fully address the problem of inequality.

A successful ACC claim may mean that a woman can get physiotherapy or even surgery in the private sector. More broadly, a woman may also receive home help and wage support. All of this assistance can be overseen by a dedicated case manager.

Although a woman can still access surgery and physiotherapy through the public health system, the waiting times can be weeks or months, and these women will neither receive home help nor wage subsidies.




Read more:
Endometriosis: three reasons care still hasn’t improved


This situation is a manifestation of a wider problem. ACC’s system has been described as “sexist” as its focus on injury and cause tends to exclude occupations where women dominate, including care jobs, teaching and government employment.

ACC is also earnings-related, which is another way in which men are treated more favourably than women, in an approach that mirrors the gender pay gap.

Out of date and discriminatory

One of the reasons given for this overall state of affairs is that the ACC legislation is still primarily designed for the accidents that occurred in 20th century workplaces such as factories, mines and workshops.

More generally, ACC has been criticised for being discriminatory and promoting serious inequalities. Former prime minister and lawyer Sir Geoffrey Palmer has called for an overhaul, arguing that to achieve social justice, New Zealand needs to replace ACC with a system that covers people incapacitated by accidents as well as those incapacitated by sickness or disability.

Under the current ACC regime, arguably, this lack of social justice affects women more significantly. Should the government decide to examine the specific issue of maternal health or engage in a complete overhaul of the ACC system, it must give effect to its legal obligations to the women of Aotearoa New Zealand.
Surely, the labour of women is worth this?

Claire Breen, Professor of Law, University of Waikato

This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

Capping Problem Gambling in NZ: The effectiveness of local government policy interventions

Source: New Zealand Ministry of Health

An analysis of the impact of three territorial authority electronic gaming machine (class 4) policies on gambling harm in New Zealand including:

  1. absolute caps on the number of electronic gaming machines (EGMs) and/or venues 
  2. per capita caps on the number of EGMs and/or venues 
  3. sinking lid policies (restricting transfer of Class 4 licences to slowly reduce availability over time).

The report’s findings demonstrate that all three forms of policy intervention are effective in reducing Class 4 venues and EGMs relative to the reference group (ie, territorial authorities with no restrictions beyond those in the Gambling Act 2003).

The report also provides an assessment of the impact of local government Class 4 gambling policies on the number of EGMs, venues, and machine spending.

Sinking lids and per capita caps are equally the most effective at reducing machine spending. Compared to the reference group, either of these policy interventions has the cumulative impact of reducing gambling expenditure by an estimated 13 to 14 per cent. Absolute caps were found to reduce overall gambling expenditure by 10 per cent. 

The report also assessed the indirect impact on the use of Ministry-funded clinical intervention services as well as personal bankruptcy rates. 

Professor’s input sought for UN Food Systems Summit

Professor's input sought for UN Food Systems Summit

Source: Massey University


The United Nations aims to launch bold new actions to transform the way the world produces and consumes food.


Professor Paul Moughan

Distinguished Professor Paul Moughan (Riddet Institute Centre of Research Excellence, hosted by Massey University) has been invited to submit a briefing document to the United Nations Food Systems Summit (UNFSS) 2021.

The UN is spearheading initiatives for future sustainable food production and global food security and the Secretary-General will convene a summit this year. The UN aims to launch bold new actions to transform the way the world produces and consumes food, delivering progress on all 17 Sustainable Development Goals.

Professor Moughan will provide a brief on the Asian region, that will be combined with similar reports for the Americas, Africa and Europe, for the global brief.

The invitation is based on his involvement with the International Academy Partnership (IAP) project on world food and nutritional security; and his authorship of the Association for Academies and Societies of Sciences in Asia (IFASSA) report on food and nutritional security for Asia.

The IAP was invited to prepare the reports for the summit by the UNFSS Scientific Group, an independent group of leading researchers and scientists from around the world. The Scientific Group are responsible for ensuring the robustness, breadth and independence of the science that underpins the UN FSS Summit and its outcomes

Massey University Provost, Professor Giselle Byrnes commented that this invitation is hugely significant, both globally and locally. “This indicates the Riddet Institute’s leadership and strength in the central area of sustainable food production for a rapidly growing human population”, she said.

IAP reports are created by a global network of science, engineering & medical academics, working together to provide independent expert advice on scientific, technological & health issues. The policy briefs for the Food Systems Summit covers issues for transformation of food systems for improved health, nutrition, sustainable agriculture, and the environment.

In the lead up to the Summit, the Riddet Institute is hosting a New Zealand food systems dialogue ‘Feed Our Future’, focussed on the role of our country in a sustainable food system of the future.

IAP reports for the UN FSS: https://www.interacademies.org/index.php/news/interacademy-partnership-iap-united-nations-food-systems-summit-un-fss

UN Food Systems Summit: https://www.un.org/food-systems-summit

Related articles

Massey researcher appointed to lead United Nations caucus
Global funding announced for the Riddet Institute
Continued CoRE funding for the Riddet Institute

Demand for Elephant Ivory in China Drops to Lowest Level Since National Ban

Demand for Elephant Ivory in China Drops to Lowest Level Since National Ban

Source: World Wildlife Fund

Beijing, China – An annual consumer survey of the elephant ivory trade in China finds that demand for ivory continues to decrease since the country banned domestic trade in 2017 and is now less than half of pre-ban levels. Just 18 percent of consumers surveyed intend to purchase ivory in the future, a significant drop from 43 percent pre-ban.

World Wildlife Fund (WWF) and research organization GlobeScan, have conducted the largest consumer survey about the elephant ivory trade in China—2,000 people in 15 cities—for four consecutive years. This annual survey is the largest assessment of changes in attitudes to ivory consumption, purchasing rates and intention to purchase, as well as awareness of the Chinese ivory ban over time.

WWF’s fourth annual survey, Demand under the Ban – China Ivory Consumption Research 2020, found:

  • Consumers’ intention to purchase ivory in the future, both before and after being reminded about the ivory ban (19% and 8% respectively), continues to drop and is now less than half of pre-ban levels in 2017 (43%, 18%).
  • Self-reported purchase of ivory in the past 12 months decreased to the lowest level in 2020 since the study began in 2017, although gifting is reported to be the most popular reason that people buy ivory.
  • Although people’s awareness of the ivory ban in 2020 declined to the lowest level since 2017, 88 percent of those surveyed believed that the sale of ivory in China is illegal.
  • After remaining relatively stable at 14% of the surveyed population in 2018 and 2019, the proportion of the population defined as Diehard Buyers has decreased significantly to 8% in 2020, less than half of the pre-ban level in 2017, although the remaining “core” Diehard Buyers are even more firm in their resolve to purchase ivory. Among this group, the most compelling driver to purchase ivory is the perception of its artistic value.
  • Regular Overseas Travelers—those who travel outside of Mainland China more than once per year (trael was possible before the outbreak of COVID-19 in 2020)— remain the only group to have increased their rate of purchasing ivory compared to 2017 levels, while having the highest level of both unprompted and prompted awareness of the ban in 2020. They also maintain their future intention to purchase ivory while most other groups’ intention have dropped steadily over years.

Although travel was greatly reduced in 2020 due to COVID-19 related restrictions, Chinese outbound travelers have continuously been identified as the group that most frequently purchased elephant ivory in the past and that has the strongest intention to buy ivory in the future compared with other groups. WWF works with the travel industry to target this key demographic with demand reduction efforts. Through the Sustainable Travel Alliance, which was established by WWF in 2020 and is endorsed by the leading travel agencies in China, WWF encourages corporate actors in the travel and tourism sector, including online and brick and mortar travel agencies and hotels, to reject the consumption of ivory and other illegal wildlife products.

“Chinese consumers have been one of the major drivers to the global ivory trade dynamics that contribute to an elephant poaching crisis across the African continent beginning around 2010, other drivers include loss of habitat and corruption in Africa and weak law enforcement in transit countries especially South East Asia,” said Zhou Fei, Chief Program Officer of WWF China. “The Chinese ivory ban is a game-changer that helps in turning the tide against the illegal ivory trade that claims thousands of elephants each year. Partners across many sectors, including China Customs, internet companies and the travel industry, have committed to a Zero Tolerance to Illegal Wildlife Trade Initiative and therefore bolstered consumer engagement efforts.”

Demand under the Ban – China Ivory Consumption Research 2020 also assessed the impact of a social media campaign which was launched in 2020. The targeted campaign, starring Chinese cultural celebrity Ma Weidu, reached 22 million people and received the highest recognition among Diehard Buyers and Regular Overseas Travelers. The survey found that the combination of information on the ivory ban and the campaign video had a strong deterrent effect on people’s intention to buy ivory in the future, changing the attitudes of 74% of those who had reported that they wanted to purchase ivory in the future.

“This research is another encouraging sign that China’s elephant ivory trade ban is being implemented and enforced effectively,” said Karen Xue, Global Director for WWF’s Ivory High Impact Initiative. “We have seen wholesale prices for ivory fall globally since 2017 and several subpopulations of savanna elephants in Africa rebound. However, we must consider the recent reclassification from the International Union of the Conservation of Nature deeming African savanna elephants and forest elephants as Endangered and Critically Endangered respectively and realize how critical a role consumer engagement and education has to play in curbing demand for ivory and reversing declining African elephant population trends.”

###

Note to editors:

  • This study, conducted by GlobeScan, an international research consultancy, is the largest and longest-running research on China’s ivory consumption, involving a total of more than 8,000 consumers in 15 cities across China in four years. This is the fourth annual survey conducted since 2017.
  • Implementation of this project was made possible with funding from the German Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ).

Consultancy Terms of Reference for CAAC programme Mapping and Harmonization Exercise of all Child Protection training programs in Sub-Saharan Africa.

Source: Save The Children

Background

The protection of children in conflict – and with it the realisation of the promises made in the declarations, conventions and statutes of the 20th century – is one of the defining challenges of the 21st century. Despite the advancement of international and regional legal and policy frameworks, the plights of children in the situation of armed conflicts remains grave and completely unacceptable. Often their rights are violated with total impunity. New evidence presented by SC is damning1:

− 420 million children – nearly one-fifth of children worldwide – are living in a conflict zone; a rise of nearly 30 million children from 2016.
− The number of children living in conflict zones has doubled since the end of the Cold War.
− 142 million children are living in high-intensity conflict-zones; that is, in conflict zones with more than 1,000 battle-related deaths in a year.
− New analysis from SC shows that the numbers of ‘grave violations’ of children’s rights in conflict reported and verified by the United Nations have almost tripled since 2010.
− Hundreds of thousands of children are dying every year as a result of indirect effects of conflict – including malnutrition, disease and the breakdown of healthcare, water and sanitation services.
The nature of conflict has changed, putting children in the frontline in new and terrible ways. They are more likely to be fought in urban areas amongst civilian populations leading to deaths and life-changing injuries, and laying waste to the infrastructure needed to guarantee access to food and water. Intra-state conflict is increasing, as are the numbers of armed actors involved. The world is witnessing deliberate campaigns of violence against civilians, including the targeting of schools and health facilities, the abduction and enslavement of girls, and deliberate starvation.
The denial of humanitarian aid is used as yet another weapon of war. The international rules and basic standards of conduct that exist to protect civilians in conflict are being flouted with impunity. Children are disproportionately suffering the consequences of these brutal trends; almost one fifth of children worldwide are now living in areas affected by armed conflict.2 We see more children facing unimaginable mental and physical trauma and toxic stress; more children going hungry; more children falling victim to preventable diseases; more children out of school; more children at risk of sexual violence and recruitment by armed groups; and more children trapped on the frontline without access to humanitarian aid.

Across Africa, 152 million children – one in four – are living in conflict-affected areas. This is an increase from 2016, when it was one in five children. According to SC’s analysis, six out of the ten worst countries for children in conflict are in Africa.3 Unfortunately, in most cases, the harm children experience in war, pervasive as they are; the opportunity for redress, to receive the necessary assistance and support, for reparation and justice remain slim or more often than not, almost non-existent.

Applications to be sent by Friday 30th April 2021 through esaro.procurement@savethechildren.org

Reference

ESARO Consultancy

Dates

Opening date: 12 April 2021

Closing date: 30 April 2021

FACILITATING CHILD-LED RESEARCH STUDIES IN MALI, NIGER AND BURKINA FASO

Source: Save The Children

1.   Introduction

The protection of children in conflict – and with it the realisation of the promises made in the declarations, conventions and statutes of the 20th century – is one of the defining challenges of the 21st century. Despite the advancement of international and regional legal and policy frameworks, the plights of children in the situation of armed conflicts remains grave and completely unacceptable. Often their rights are violated with total impunity. New evidence presented by SC is damning[1]:

420 million children – nearly one-fifth of children worldwide – are living in a conflict zone; a rise of nearly 30 million children from 2016.

  • The number of children living in conflict zones has doubled since the end of the Cold War.
  • 142 million children are living in high-intensity conflict-zones; that is, in conflict zones with more than 1,000 battle-related deaths in a year.
  • New analysis from SC shows that the numbers of ‘grave violations’ of children’s rights in conflict reported and verified by the United Nations have almost tripled since 2010.
  • Hundreds of thousands of children are dying every year as a result of indirect effects of conflict – including malnutrition, disease and the breakdown of healthcare, water and sanitation services.

The nature of conflict has changed, putting children in the frontline in new and terrible ways. They are more likely to be fought in urban areas amongst civilian populations leading to deaths and life-changing injuries, and laying waste to the infrastructure needed to guarantee access to food and water. Intra-state conflict is increasing, as are the numbers of armed actors involved. The world is witnessing deliberate campaigns of violence against civilians, including the targeting of schools and health facilities, the abduction and enslavement of girls, and deliberate starvation. The denial of humanitarian aid is used as yet another weapon of war. The international rules and basic standards of conduct that exist to protect civilians in conflict are being flouted with impunity. Children are disproportionately suffering the consequences of these brutal trends; almost one fifth of children worldwide are now living in areas affected by armed conflict.[2] We see more children facing unimaginable mental and physical trauma and toxic stress; more children going hungry; more children falling victim to preventable diseases; more children out of school; more children at risk of sexual violence and recruitment by armed groups; and more children trapped on the frontline without access to humanitarian aid.

Across Africa, 152 million children – one in four – are living in conflict-affected areas. This is an increase from 2016, when it was one in five children. According to SC’s analysis, six out of the ten worst countries for children in conflict are in Africa.[3] Unfortunately, in most cases, the harm children experience in war, pervasive as they are; the opportunity for redress, to receive the necessary assistance and support, for reparation and justice remain slim or more often than not, almost non-existent.

The shrinking of humanitarian space disproportionally affects children worldwide, and this is equally true in West Africa: in this region, a significant proportion of those displaced by conflict and violence are children. Three areas currently concentrate the bulk of conflict-related child displacement in West Africa, namely Eastern DRC, Lake Chad Basin and Sahel region – more precisely in Mali, Burkina Faso, Niger cross-border crisis in the Liptako-Gourma area. In recent years, the focus on security and development has led to the development of new strategies for the Sahel: the double and triple nexus (AGIR, G5 Sahel, Sahel Alliance, UN Support Plan for Sahel). However, it is clear that the strengthening of civil-military coordination stems more from the priority given to the security program rather than from the need to reinforce the prioritization of humanitarian needs. Moreover, this approach jeopardizes the respect of the humanitarian principles because of the conflicting agendas between different mandated organizations operating in the same arena. It is therefore important for the humanitarian community to strengthen the coordination and convergence with development actors to bridge the humanitarian-development gap in order to reduce the structural vulnerabilities as part for the nexus and “New Ways of Working” agenda.

Applications to be sent by Friday 30th April 2021 through esaro.procurement@savethechildren.org

Yemen: Six years of war, six stories of children

Yemen: Six years of war, six stories of children

Source: Save The Children

Violence and bloodshed remains an almost daily occurrence for children in Yemen. Over the past three years, almost one in four casualties in the conflict were children.

It’s a stark reminder that children and families are paying the heaviest price for this brutal war through no fault of their own.

After six years of war, photographer Anna Pantelia, captures the stories of loss and sadness, but also children’s resilience and determination to rebuild their lives after six years of war in Yemen. Accompanying each portrait is a story of losing loved ones, physical injuries from explosives and having to flee their homes because of the fighting. here are the stories of six children in their own words.

Falak*, 16

“When I was in the 9th grade, I had to stop going to school due financial problems

“I thought that there is no hope for me. I didn’t have any dreams when I was young because I was feeling that I was in such a bad situation… I used to come to Taiz city to get food assistance from some organisations.

“I met someone from Save the Children and they informed me about the vocational trainings they offer to children [adolescents] like me. I was registered for these trainings and I chose to get trained in sewing.

“I was very happy… This training that I got from Save the Children is not just about sewing. They helped us understand the importance of keeping our dignity, being independent, being resilient and gave us guidance on how protect ourselves.

“I hope one day Yemen will be safe for everyone and I hope I will continue being independent so my family will not have to depend on anyone.”

Musa*, 15

“I was going to school but when the war started six years ago my family and I had to flee from Taiz. One day while I was in the market I heard clashes. I was going back home when a shell hit the neighbourhood. I fell on the ground unconscious. When I opened my eyes I was covered in blood. I was only 10… Shrapnel from the shell pierced my whole body and head.

“I stayed out of education for four years. Once the armed people left our neighbourhood in Taiz we decided to come back. Then I was able again to continue my education.”

Sadam*, 14

“Before the war, I had a good life; we had our own house and I was going to school, I was playing with my friends, I was feeling safe. I used to play football. I enjoyed playing football the most.

“When the war started, my life was not the same. One day, I an airstrike hit the area where we were. My dad died instantly and I was injured in the leg. I had an operation but my leg was broken in four different places so after the operation I couldn’t walk properly, I had to be held by someone.

“Now I am not going to school because I recently had another operation in my leg and I am still recovering. I am really looking forward to going back to school when my leg is better.

“When I grow up, I want to become a doctor so I can help people who are sick and injured. I hope Yemen will become as it was before the war so I can go back to Al-Mokha.”

Omar*, 8

“We were at school when we heard explosions. We ran inside the school and when they finished we went out again to play. One of my friends got injured in one of the explosions.

“I was on my way home with a friend and I wanted to go to find my brother when the artillery shell hit us.

“I was paralyzed for a moment. Then someone on a motorbike picked me up and took me to the hospital;

“I want toys to be able to play but I don’t want any shelling.”

Hosam*, 16

“We had dreams to have a nice house and live there. We had friends and toys to play with. I was hoping to become a doctor one day and my brother hoped to become an architect.

“When the war started we had to flee our house due to the bombings. We saw three houses in our neighbourhood getting bombed on the same day. Our school was also bombed. Neither me or my brother went to school after this. Then we fled.

“I wasn’t thinking of continuing education but after Save the Children started to engage with us, I decided to continue. They helped me to register in public school. I started to study about five months ago. I struggle with writing but I am getting better. Reading is easier for me.”

Bushra*, 15

“Before the war I had a normal life. I went to school in my wheelchair. I had friends coming over and we used to chat, draw and sing in my room. I felt safe.

“After the war started I got displaced twice. It was three years ago when I was at school in Hodeida and an airstrike hit the neighbourhood of my school. Everyone was very scared and the school got damaged.

“We couldn’t go back to school for a week after that and even then there were more and more attacks in schools, so all schools in the area stopped operating. I started feeling very afraid.”

Save the Children has been working in Yemen since 1963. We are the largest aid organisation operating in Yemen, and have been responding to the current crisis since 2015. 

We work in 11 regions, implementing health, nutrition, child protection, food security and livelihoods, education and water and sanitation interventions. Read more about our work in Yemen and how you can support.

Covid-19 – Passengers on three Auckland bus journeys are asked to watch for symptoms

Source: MIL-OSI Submissions

Source: Auckland Regional Public Health Service 
Auckland Regional Public Health Service (ARPHS) has identified three bus journeys taken by Case B, the security guard from the Grand Millennium managed isolation facility, later diagnosed with COVID-19.
Passengers who were on these buses at these times are considered to be casual contacts, as the case sat away from others and wore a mask. Casual contacts need to watch for symptoms of COVID-19, and call Healthline on 0800 358 54 53 and get tested if they become unwell.
ARPHS is working with Auckland Transport to alert passengers on these buses who had registered their HOP card with their contact details. There will be a COVID-19 tracer app push notification as well for those who have scanned the QR code on each bus.
Bus journey details
 Monday 29 March, bus 25 L, taken between 6:19 and 6:44, from St James, Queen St (Stop 7058) to 1530 Dominion Rd, (Stop 8444) 
 Saturday 3 April (Easter Saturday), bus 25 L, taken between 17:19 and 17:47, from 1279 Dominion Rd (Stop 8445) to St James, Queen St (Stop 7058) 
 Sunday 4 April (Easter Sunday), bus 25 L, taken between 17:13 and 17:38, from 1215 Dominion Rd (Stop 8443) to St James Queen St (Stop 7058).
This information is from AT HOP card data and reflects the time the case boarded and disembarked the buses. Extra time has been added on either side of each bus trip on the Ministry of Health Location of Interest page to ensure we reach all potential contacts.
The symptoms of COVID-19 include one or more of the following:
a new or worsening cough fever (at least 38C) shortness of breath a sore throat sneezing and runny nose temporary loss of smell.
Some people may have less typical symptoms such as only: fever, diarrhoea, headache, muscle pain, nausea/vomiting, or confusion/irritability.
Anyone who has shown these symptoms, or who develops them, should free phone Healthline for advice (0800 358 5453) and arrange to get tested.
Further information from Auckland Transport
Auckland Transport is working with the Auckland Regional Public Health Service to establish the bus trip links and trace any other passengers.
Most bus travel in Auckland is paid for via the electronic AT Hop card, which would help any tracing required. Already, around 90.8 per cent of people travelling regularly on public transport use a registered AT HOP card, which is among one of the highest rates in the world.
The card can be used to identify what trips have been taken and where a customer may have ‘topped up’ its balance. Auckland Transport is happy to assist health authorities with any information they require.
To maintain privacy, if AT is required to share information under the Health Act, data will be transmitted by secure file transfer protocol. AT only shares customer details deemed critical to assist with contact tracing such as name, address, phone number and travel details relating to the case.
Face coverings are still mandatory on public transport. Please continue to scan the QR codes and tag on/off using your AT HOP card – this will help AT to support contact tracing requirements should they become necessary. If you forget your face mask, you can purchase them in vending machines at transport facilities and service centres.
AT is continuing to ensure that all public transport is being cleaned throughout its daily service. Buses, trains and ferries are being spot checked, with surfaces being sanitised, and AT has enhanced its cleaning regime to include antimicrobial protection fogging (spraying) of facilities.
If customers need assistance in obtaining or loading an AT HOP card, they can visit a customer service centre, or call 09 355 3553.